Monday, May 25, 2015

Avocado trees - Spots on the leaves?





Originating in Mexico, the persea mite, Oligonychus perseae, was found in California in the early 1990’s and probably came to the Big Island of Hawaii in the early 2000’s. The main host for the mites is avocado trees. Some varieties are more susceptible than others; the Lamb-Haas is considered least susceptible. Many ornamentals and weeds also host the persea mite.  The adult mites have eight legs and an oval body with two dark reddish eye spots near the head end of the body. They lack antennae and body segmentation.


                                                            

Mites feed both on the fruit and leaves, most notably on the underside of leaves. The damage appears as small, circular, yellow to brown spots. Mite colonies often reside against the protruding midrib vein of the underside of the leaves. They produce a dense, silk webbing of protection over them. The webbing resembles a silvery spot on the underside of the leaf, often seen glistening under sunlight.  


Premature leaf drop will begin once the feeding damage to the leaves reaches and exceeds 10% of the surface area. This can lead to sunburned bark and fruit; yields have been reduced up to 20 %.  Trees will recover from the defoliation by producing a new flush. But repeated dropping of the foliage will severely stress the tree.


In the home garden, some mites can be tolerated. Several species of natural enemies often reduce the population of the mites. If numbers get too high, horticultural oils will suppress the mite population. It is important that the spray solution contact the undersides of the leaves, where mites are located. Where feasible, spraying the undersides with a forceful stream of water can also reduce mite populations. By using hydrated lime or diluted white latex paint, a whitewashing on the trunk and major limbs will help protect bark and wood from sunburn after a premature leaf drop.

Photo of Mites: UC IPM Program