Monday, December 1, 2014

Spittlebugs



Are your plants foaming at the leaves?

A white frothy substance on plants may be a spittlebug. Inside all that froth is a tiny bug about ¼ - ½ inch long.  The immature stage of this insect sucks the plant juices just as aphids do. But in the process, spittlebugs remove so much water and carbohydrates, that excess fluid is produced. They then cover themselves with this fluid. The spittle is produced when the insect bubbles air from the tip of the abdomen into the liquid. This is an ingenious method to protect themselves from predators and  from drying out.

Although the removal the plant fluids can weaken the plant, rarely are spittlebugs a serious problem. Simply spraying a strong stream of water can physically remove the pest. A soap/oil spray can also be used.

In addition to basil, the spittlebug attacks other common plants such as rosemary, mint, hibiscus and some pine trees.